BBQ BATTLE ROYALE: Dry Rub vs. Marinade vs. BBQ Sauce

dry rub vs marinade vs bbq sauceWhether you are dining on meat or vegetables, there are countless ways to season them– especially if they are headed for the grill! Since cooking over open flame is volatile, it is important to seal in flavours as thoroughly as possible. With that in mind, world famous chefs and pitmasters have settled on three methods of preparation: dry rubs, marinades and barbecue sauces. You may know some of the differences, but do you know how each should be used? Read on for D’Arcy’s BBQ Battle Royale and settle the score once and for all!

DRY RUB

The term “dry rub” is simply an umbrella that covers an infinite number of spice blends. These mixtures contain no liquid (“dry”) and they are worked into the raw ingredients by hand (“rub”). The hands-on approach means every crevice is coated with your chosen flavours; keeping the seasoning dry means less liquids will drip onto your cooking surface. An intense first-bite and blackened crust are some of the biggest attractions of meat or veg cooked with a dry rub.

MARINADE

Originally from the Spanish mar for sea, the term “marinade” was introduced into French cuisine at the start of the 18th-century– it meant to be pickled in a salty brine. Since then, marinade has evolved into a modern home cooking term to describe any seasoning (containing at least one liquid ingredient) used to infuse flavours into meat or vegetables. The key behind using a marinade is including a vinegar or another fluid with a chemical property that breaks down and softens food. A well-made marinade will produce fork-tender results while imparting a rich flavour and depth to the dish.

BBQ SAUCE

For many of us, the first time we encountered barbecue sauce may have been as a dipping sauce for chicken fingers… But of course, BBQ sauce is best used: on the barbecue! While suitable for a marinade, BBQ sauce typically has high sugar content– so it can burn easily if left over an open flame for an extended period. Ideally, you should apply your chosen BBQ sauce right at the end of high-temperature grilling. Alternatively, you may use BBQ sauce as a basting liquid if you are cooking for an extended period over a long temperature. Another tip is to boil down or reduce BBQ sauce to create a glaze!

AND THE WINNER IS…

…Your tastebuds! All of these methods are delicious on their own, but they can even be combined for mouthwatering results. The only limits is your imagination and the Laws of Thermodynamics– any questions and concerns can be answered by the experts at D’Arcy’s Meat Market. Contact or visit us today!

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